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  • $55.00
    In this paper, the author examines the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act (BIA) provisions geared toward dealing with those using bankruptcy to absolve themselves of past transgressions – the fraudsters. Specifically, he looks at the various tools provided to trustees and creditors under the BIA, discussing topics like these: proving fraud, degrees of fraud, the Fraudulent Preferences Act and the Statute of Elizabeth, and the badges of fraud. Added bonus: Bankruptcy 101 Glossary of terms by the author, providing an alphabetical list of typical bankruptcy-related terms and a concise explanation of each. This paper was presented at the Bankruptcy Seminar in January, 2014.  
  • The author provides a general overview of tax obligations within a personal bankruptcy. He also examines situations where tax debt forms a significant part of the bankrupt’s debt and looks at how courts have treated bankrupts’ applications for discharge. More specifically, the author discusses the impact of s 172.1 of the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act, including the factors that the bankruptcy courts consider when dealing with a discharge application under this section. Added bonus: Bankruptcy 101 Glossary of terms by Craig McMahon, Field LLP, providing an alphabetical list of typical bankruptcy-related terms and a concise explanation of each. This paper was presented at the Bankruptcy Seminar in January, 2014.  
  • 61916.08
    $55.00
    This paper provides a short overview of the terminology related to costs, for example the difference between “party and party costs” and “solicitor and own client costs”. The author also discusses the factors considered by the courts in making a costs award, the assessment of costs by the assessment officer and the role of Schedule C. This paper was presented at the Civil Litigation Procedures for LSS Seminar in February 2014.
  • This paper provides a background to the pre-trial dispute resolution processes available to parties to an action in Alberta, discussing the pros and cons of each type of ADR and the details about the requirements of each. The author also explains the different ways that a trial may be scheduled where ADR is unsuccessful. This paper was presented at the Civil Litigation Procedures for LSS Seminar in February 2014.
  • This author examines the role of the legal assistant in facilitating the use of the expert witness on a litigation file. Citing the relevant Rules of Court, the author looks at tasks and issues from sending letters of instruction and the proper form of an expert’s report to serving expert reports and arranging for an expert’s attendance at trial. This paper was presented at the Civil Litigation Procedures for LSS Seminar in February 2014.
  • $65.00
    This paper provides an overview of the typical litigation file, and the assistant’s role in it, as it moves through the court process. Beginning at the start of an action, the author covers issues like preparing commencement pleadings, their time lines, ending litigation without a trial (default judgments, summary judgments, striking for delay), documents relating to the questioning process, the road to trial and how to prepare for it, and post-trial documents like the bill of costs. A civil claim process flowchart and document precedents are attached. This paper was presented at the Civil Litigation Procedures for LSS Seminar in February 2014.
  • In this paper, the author provides a brief refresher for lawyers practicing civil litigation in Alberta. The author discusses the new conflicts rules in the Code of Conduct, the drop dead rule, booking a trial, and court assistance in litigation. The paper concludes with a number of practical litigation tips. This paper was presented at the Law and Practice Update program in November 2012.  
  • Organized by the different sections of the Alberta Rules of Court, this collection of papers provides case summaries and analysis of recent significant decisions under the Alberta Rules of Court. Included are discussions on the following: • Foundational Rules, by Glenn Solomon QC • Court Actions, by Darren J. Reed and Deborah Book • Managing Litigation, by Gavin Price and Johanna FitzPatrick • Disclosure of Information, by Kent Jesse and Justin Krikler • Applications, by Laurie Goldbach • Trials and Experts, by Edward W. Halt QC and Johanna C. Price • Judgments and Orders, by David Jardine • Technical Rules, by Vivian R. Stevenson QC and Alex Kennedy These papers were presented at the Rules of Court Interpreted program in November 2012.  
  • This paper begins with a brief overview of the social media websites that employment lawyers should have a working knowledge of, and explores the nature of potentially relevant evidence found on these websites. The author outlines of how social media evidence can be preserved before and throughout the litigation process by providing an overview of spoliation and preservation orders. The paper concludes with a discussion of how lawyers must ‘click with caution’ when gathering social media evidence due to privacy and ethical issues. The admissibility of social media evidence obtained through improper means is also discussed. This paper was presented at the Employment Law Update program held in October and November of 2012.  
  • $35.00
    This paper defines most of the terms you are likely to encounter in the eDiscovery process. From Boolean search and data mining, to slack and spoliation, this paper leaves no stone unturned in the world of ediscovery terminology. This paper was drawn from materials presented at the Civil Litigation for LSS seminar held in May 2012.